Contributing to our understanding of marine mammals through response and science for over 25 years.

Recent Publication Links Environmental Change with Strandings

A recent study by Truchon and co-authors found a significant link between environmental change and the number of marine mammal strandings in the St. Lawrence ecosystem. This is another reminder about how important stranding response is because it shows how much we learn about workings of the ocean and global ecosystem in addition to marine mammals!  You can read more…

About Us

Dr. David Casper is the Director of the Marine Mammal Stranding Program as well as the veterinarian for U.C. Santa Cruz. Dr. Casper earned his D.V.M. from the University of Illinois and worked as the Director of Research and Veterinarian for the John G. Shedd Aquarium prior to becoming the attending veterinarian for U.C. Santa Cruz. Dr. Casper has a…

Recent Stranding Cases

On January 14, 2013 volunteers from the Long Marine Lab Stranding Network responded to an 800+ pound California Sea Lion that had stranded on Main Beach in Santa Cruz, CA. Given the size of the animal, LML Stranding Network Manager, Dr. Robin Dunkin, worked with officials from the city of Santa Cruz to coordinate a beach necropsy and subsequent burial.…

Porpoise Necropsy with Moss Landing Marine Lab

LML stranding operations manager, Dr. Robin Dunkin, performed a necropsy demonstration for the marine mammals class at Moss Landing Marine Labs in September of 2012. Course instructor Dr. Bill Henry and TA, Stephanie Hughes, assisted with the necropsy and students were able to really get a hands-on experience to learn more about the anatomy and physiology of cetaceans. The porpoise…

LML Stranding Volunteers Respond to Gray Whale Carcass

Long Marine Lab Stranding Program volunteers responded to a gray whale calf near Sunset State Beach on May 4th, 2012. In collaboration with Mr. Bob Nabuhara with the Monterey Bay Academy, the calf was pulled out of the surf line early Friday. Volunteers then performed a necropsy on the calf later that afternoon. A missing tongue and characteristic teeth, or…

Why Do Marine Mammals Strand?

Marine mammals may strand for any number of reasons.  Marine mammals, like humans, get sick, tired, lost, or seperated from their mom when they are young.  Pinnipeds, the seals and sea lions, often come to shore as part of their normal life history.  Seals and sea lions will come ashore to rest, molt, and give birth.  If you see a…

Report a Marine Mammal Stranding

Have you found a dead or live marine mammal on the beach?   

For DEAD marine mammals in Santa Cruz County: 831.212.1272

For DEAD marine mammals in other counties: In San Mateo County: 415.379.5381 In Monterey County: 831.771.4422

{jb_bluebox}For LIVE marine mammals in Santa Cruz County & greater SF Bay Area: In San Jose, San Mateo and Marin Counties: 415.289.SEAL…

What is the Marine Mammal Stranding Network?

The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) of 1972 was enacted in response to increasing concerns among scientists and the public that significant declines in some species of marine mammals were caused by human activities. The Act established a national policy to prevent marine mammal species and population stocks from declining beyond the point where they ceased to be significant…